Videos

In this video, parents with learning difficulties talk about what it's like to be a parent, talking about their disability with their children, asking for help, and advice for new parents.

In this video, three families where one or both parents have intellectual disability, share what parenthood and family life means for them. 


More Parent Stories

Tyneisha   and baby Tayden

Tyneisha and baby Tayden

Amanda, her twin girls and her godmother

Amanda, her twin girls and her godmother

Michael and Taylor

Michael and Taylor

Ismail

Ismail


Robert Strike: Self-Advocate

Robert Strike is a father of three, and Co-founder of Self Advocacy, New South Wales (Australia).  He and Dr David McConnell published Robert’s seven-point plan for workers supporting parents with intellectual disability.

Strike4.jpg
The purpose of this paper is to encourage workers to listen, and to work together with parents with intellectual disability. I believe that workers can teach us and we can teach them

In summary, the seven-point plan is as follows:

  1.   Look beyond the disability label—you will be surprised!  Labels are for jars not for people.
  2.   Talk to us, NOT at us, nor through others.
  3.   Hearing is not enough. LISTEN to us and RESPECT what we say.
  4.   Do things with us, not for us.
  5.   Explain things slowly and get straight to the point.
  6.   Talk to us face to face.
  7.   Be honest with us . . . we have antennas for bullshit!

To read more about the seven-point plan, See: Strike, R., & McConnell, D. (2002) Look At Me, Listen to Me, I Have Something Important to SaySexuality and Disability, 20 (1), 53 - 63.